Catch up with our May fundraising update! Find out all the activity, moves and news within fundraising and philanthropy. You are welcome to email Lise your news at ltaylor@bomborapublishing.com.au.

 

$400 million gift coincides with wider philanthropy ‘flatlining’

QUT philanthropy researcher Associate Professor Wendy Scaife has welcomed this week’s $400 million national gift by Twiggy and Nicola Forrest as a ‘role model’ act of generosity in a time of wider philanthropy ‘flatlining’.

“Today’s announcement of a record Australian $400 million gift by Twiggy and Nicola Forrest comes at a time when fewer Australians are giving but those who do are giving more,” said Professor Scaife, who leads QUT’s Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies (ACPNS).

She said the ACPNS led the recent Giving Australia 2016 research – the largest ever research project into giving and volunteering working with CSI Swinburne and the Centre for Corporate Public Affairs.  The research was commissioned by the Department of Social Services and Prime Minister’s Community Business Partnership.

“The figures from our research raise concerns about giving starting to flatline,” she said.

“While 87 per cent of Australian adults gave in Giving Australia 2005, this dropped to 80.8 per cent in the latest 2016 study.

“Australia has seen a spate of very large donations only in recent years and ACPNS’ annual analysis of the ATO tax deductible donations data consistently points to four out of 10 of the nation’s affluent individuals not donating.

“This makes decisions such as today’s by the Forrests even more of a standout, and an important role model for others who have done well in business or had a windfall that they might want to invest in the community and causes they value.

“ACPNS research confirms many people who become large givers were prompted to act by seeing a business colleague put their money into a charitable need.”

“Giving Australia 2016’s survey of philanthropy and philanthropists found that 92.9 per cent were motivated by a belief that giving can make a difference and the trend of today’s allocation by Twiggy Forrest suggests selection of areas where impact is needed.”

The Giving Australia Fact Sheets on philanthropy and on individual giving are available online.

 

Atlassian pledges up to US$1 million for MIT’s Solve Initiative

Atlassian Foundation International will pledge up to US$1 million in grant funding through Massachusetts Institute of Technology Solve’s Youth, Skills, and Workforce of the Future Challenge to selected “Solvers” that uncover the world’s most scalable education models.

Atlassian Foundation International aims to help prepare 10 million disadvantaged youth for the workforce of the future, within 10 years, or “10 in 10.”

“Education has been proven time and time again to be the best way to break the poverty cycle, which is why we’re focusing our philanthropic efforts on helping prepare disadvantaged youth for the workforce of the future,” says Mark Reading, Head of Atlassian Foundation.

“We’re teaming up with MIT’s Solve initiative to find the world’s best scalable education solutions that will help prepare the workforce of tomorrow. We hope other organisations will join us in uncovering the very best education initiatives.”

Solve is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that identifies and supports lasting solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges.

Solve is a community that brings together technologists, social entrepreneurs, business leaders, policymakers, researchers, and other change agents to unearth and implement solutions to specific, actionable challenges around education, health, sustainability, and economic prosperity.

Solve’s mission is to crowdsolve global challenges by:

– Identifying the best solutions to specific, actionable challenges through open innovation.

– Building and convening a community of leaders and change-makers committed to partnering together to pilot and implement these solutions.

The Solve Initiative, brought together 400 leaders from technology, business, nonprofit, government and academia to CrowdSolve global challenges at its annual flagship event, held May 8-10.

With its new application site just launched, Solve will announce four new challenges today asking for solutions from anyone from around the world. Submissions are due by August 1, 2017, on these four challenges:

1. Youth, Skills, and the Workforce of the Future 

2. Brain Health 

3. Sustainable Urban Communities 

4. Women and Technology

See more at: solve.mit.edu.

 

Aussie TV star Mike Goldman to champion deaf and hearing impaired children

Children’s charity The Shepherd Centre has announced Australian TV presenter and actor Mike Goldman as the organisation’s official ambassador. Goldman will be helping to raise awareness of the importance of early intervention support for hearing impaired children across the country.

Goldman, who is known for his time hosting Big Brother Australia and role in Hoges: The Paul Hogan Story, first became involved with The Shepherd Centre during its annual fundraising campaign Loud Shirt Day in 2016. Now, he’s on a mission to bring Australia’s attention to the importance of teaching deaf children hearing and spoken language skills.

Goldman says, “The Shepherd Centre helps deaf kids and kids with hearing loss learn how to listen and speak – which is really important. What’s incredible is that 85 percent of these kids usually learn to speak by the time they go to school just as well as their hearing peers.”

“Participating in Loud Shirt Day was a lot of fun. A friend of mine has two kids with hearing loss who go to The Shepherd Centre and after seeing more of the work that they do, I had to get involved.”

“The sooner kids can visit the Shepherd Centre and get intervention, the better the outcome. If you can learn to hear what your friends, your family and your teachers are saying, you won’t get left behind,” says Goldman.

Jim Hungerford, Chief Executive Officer of The Shepherd Centre, said Goldman’s passion makes him the perfect advocate for The Shepherd Centre’s programs and the successes of these children.

To hear more from Mike Goldman about why he is supporting The Shepherd Centre video visit: https://youtu.be/d0TV-qMEIrY.

 

Guide Dogs Australia named ‘Most Trusted Charity’ for fifth year

Guide Dogs Australia has been announced as Australia’s Most Trusted Charity Brand, maintaining their exclusive hold on the title for a fifth consecutive year. The organisation received this honour as part of the annual Reader’s Digest’s Trusted Brands survey, which added the charity category in 2013.

Guide Dogs spokesperson and CEO for Guide Dogs NSW/ACT Dr Graeme White said the achievement highlighted the significance of a trusting relationship between a person with sight loss and their Guide Dog.

“It is a great honour for Guide Dogs to be named most trusted charity for the fifth year in a row. Trust is at the heart of everything we do, particularly between a person with sight loss and their Guide Dog which gives them the freedom to get around safely and independently,” said Dr White.

“This trust extends to the community, who love to see our iconic Guide Dogs out and about with their Handler. We frequently hear from locals who have spotted a working dog – it’s a rare opportunity for people to see a cause they support in action.”

The unique bond between Handler and Guide Dog is something Guide Dogs client Barbara Bonfield has experienced for the past 24 years. Born with a retinal eye condition that caused her to become blind by the age of 12, Barbara originally relied on other mobility methods for decades before receiving her first Guide Dog in 1993.

“Having a Guide Dog has made an enormous difference to my mobility and quality of life over the years. I travel more frequently now and it’s reassuring when I am out, to be able to completely trust my Guide Dog Samara,” said Ms Bonfield.

“Many people don’t realise how exhausting going out can be when you’re blind and the need to rely so heavily on other senses to keep safe. But with Samara I have more energy and confidence; I know that when I catch a train she will always find the door to my right, meaning she will always be between me and the gap so that I won’t fall. I really do trust Samara with my life.”

Guide Dogs relies on the support and generosity of the local community to be able to provide services to people with vision impairment as the charity receives less than 10 per cent of its funding from the government.

“Every day, 28 Australians are diagnosed with sight loss, including nine who become blind, and without the ongoing trust and support of the community, we would not be able to continue our important work,” said Dr White.

It is estimated that by 2020, one million Australians will be vision impaired, with 100,000 becoming blind. Currently only one in four people who need a Guide Dog has one

The Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands survey was independently conducted by Roy Morgan Research and included a cross-section of 2,450 Australian participants. The survey has been conducted annually for 18 years, with the charity category being included from 2013.

 

Everydayhero launches new Automated, Behavioural Email Coaching Programs

Australia and New Zealand’s peer-to-peer fundraising platform Everydayhero has just released its Automated, Behavioural Email Coaching Programs. Everydayhero is a Blackbaud Inc. company and an innovative fundraising platform, empowering non-profits with peer-to-peer fundraising opportunities.

Research shows an increase in engagement and conversion when communications are tailored to their specific recipient. Everydayhero’s new Fundraiser Coaching Program builds dynamic journeys for each participant using behavioural automation specifically created to optimise fundraising.

Everydayhero’s product manager Jason Harwood explains the potential benefits for charities: “In our conversations with charities, we repeatedly hear reports of fundraiser apathy and poor engagement over long periods. People begin fundraising with a flurry, but quickly lose interest, or register for an event and have a fundraising page created, then fail to activate the page or raise a single dollar.  Feedback has also revealed that supporters often feel alone and don’t know whether their effort is making a difference – all of which can have a negative impact on engagement levels.

“Email automation seeks to solve these issues by providing poignant emails to fundraisers at key moments in time, based on a series of crucial triggers and touchpoints such as initial signup or achieving key fundraising milestones.”

On the charity side, setting up automated, behavioural communications can be a time consuming and resource intensive task. Everydayhero’s new Automated, Behavioural Programs take care of the complicated data and scheduling work, freeing up time for non-profits to focus on acquiring more supporters and building great personal relationships.

From fundraising activation to post-event recognition, these programs are designed to enhance the fundraising experience for both supporters and non-profits. Everydayhero offers six phases of communications based around three pillars: event engagement, fundraiser acquisition and cause connection. From pre-defined packages to a fully customised approach, these programs are designed to fit the needs of any event.

 

Bridging Hope Charity Foundation announces three-year, $450,000 partnership with Lifeline to extend suicide and crisis support services to Chinese communities 

The Bridging Hope Charity Foundation today announced a three-year partnership with Lifeline with the aim of developing a crisis support service for the Chinese community within Australia. The partnership was formally announced at a lunch event hosted by Lifeline Chairman John Brogden AM at the Sofitel Wentworth in Sydney on Wednesday 17 May, with The Hon. Gladys Berejiklian MP, Premier of New South Wales in conversation with Mike Munro AM.
 
The Bridging Hope Charity Foundation’s partnership, valued at $450,000 over three years, will initially support a specific Mandarin and Cantonese feasibility study in 2017 to understand how Lifeline can better connect with the Chinese community in Australia. The long-term goal over the three-year partnership is to provide Australian-based Chinese communities with more accessible crisis support and suicide prevention services. 
 
Tina Tian, Founder and Director of the Bridging Hope Charity Foundation added: “This partnership is the outcome of the joint desires of our Foundation and Lifeline to support the growth of their important crisis services for the greater good of our communities.”
 
John Brogden, Chairman of Lifeline, commented: Thank you to the Bridging Hope Charity Foundation for supporting our national charity to reach more people who may be struggling with life’s challenges. As well as being about service development, this partnership sends a strong message to community members that – regardless of your age, background or ethnicity – if you are going through tough times or are thinking about suicide, you should never have to be alone.
 
Bridging Hope Charity Foundation will also support Lifeline’s establishment, research and promotion of a Mandarin and Cantonese Crisis Support Service through its connections with the Chinese community and business leaders.Last year, Lifeline received over 1 million calls from people in crisis across Australia, providing highly-skilled and heart-warming support to people in their darkest moments. More than 3,000 Australians died by suicide in 2016, representing double the national road toll. 

For non-English speakers, Lifeline’s 24/7 crisis support services can be accessed through the free Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) on 131 450. The caller should then ask to talk to Lifeline on 13 11 14 in the language required.

 

A new force in policy and governance PD

PolGovPro is a new enterprise dedicated to helping busy NFP professionals to improve the quality and effectiveness of their policy and governance work.

In addition to its very practical and hands-on professional development programs, it’s services include online resources, podcasts and news feeds designed to stimulate and better equip frontline policy and governance professionals to perform their roles at the highest level.

Policy and governance practitioners at all levels in associations and charities (manager, director, officer and CEO) are its primary target audience, and PolGovPro services have been developed in response to the complexity of their work, and the resource limits within which that work is done.

PolGovPro was established by Garry Pearson, who was until recently, CEO of the Australian Dental Association (Victorian Branch) – ADAVB. For over 30 years Pearson has held senior executive and board secretariat roles in major education and health organisations across both public and private sectors.  He has served as a director of a proprietary limited company and a company limited by guarantee, as board secretary to a statutory authority, and as secretary/public officer of both an incorporated association and a health promoting charity (of which he was also founder).  In the distant past, he also served as a school council member.

Throughout his career, Pearson has delivered hundreds of presentations and acted as facilitator to countless seminars and workshops, frequently on policy and governance themes.

A proud achievement at the ADAVB was establishment of the Health Sector Leadership Program with Leadership Victoria, where the emerging leaders of seven health professions have been supported to become more effective in their roles, and to network across disciplines.  Garry also convened policy workshops for professional associations in the health sector, and it was these experiences which led to the recognition that PolGovPro could address a need for more practical policy and governance skills training across the entire NFP sector.

Through PolGovPro (polgovpro.com.au), Garry is training, advising and mentoring third sector policy and governance professionals.

 

Australian not-for-profit sector more innovative according to new report

The 2017 GiveEasy Innovation Index has reported a 9% increase in innovation performance for Australian not-for-profits in the last 12 months. The Index, released on 11 May, reveals an innovation score of 63.3 – up from 58.3 in 2016.

Jeremy Tobias, CEO of digital giving provider GiveEasy, says the latest research into innovation performance of the sector shows clear cultural and behavioural changes in the not-for-profit (NFP) organisations.

“Pleasingly, we can see that NFPs have pivoted from keeping up with innovation to embracing and embedding innovative practices into their organisations. While there is certainly still room to further increase, it is clear that progress is being made.”

Supporters of the 2017 Innovation Index are Australia Post, Westpac and Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) – enablers and champions of transformation and innovation in the not-for-profit sector.

The highest performing vector from this year’s Innovation Index was technology. NFPs see technology as a key driver of innovation, with more than half of NFPs recognising that the speed of digital transformation is driving technology innovation within their organisation.

“NFPs are now morphing into digital businesses, as the analogue approach is slow and time consuming. The digital economy speeds up the process of bringing new products to market, providing access to a wider donor community and new opportunities for collaboration. At GiveEasy, we are seeing the sector shift to digital giving,” said Mr Tobias.

One of the key vectors measured in the Index to assess the level of innovation, Stakeholder Centricity, jumped an astonishing 11.5 points (increase of 23%) to 2017. In previous years, this was the lowest performing vector, measuring 50.1 in 2015 and 50.7 in 2016.

“As NFPs exist to serve their beneficiaries, improved stakeholder focus is great news. Highly innovative NFPs are collaborating more with their communities, employees, volunteers and beneficiaries. Increasingly the service experience is more approachable, more human, which matches the public perception of the sector,” said Mr Tobias.

Organisational culture was also measured and has a huge impact on innovation success, with high innovators encouraging and measuring innovation year-on-year.

“Highly innovative groups encourage employees and incentivise knowledge sharing. Leading innovators are moving away from financial targets towards recognising and rewarding innovative and collaborative ways of working,” said Mr Tobias.

The 2017 GiveEasy Innovation Index is being launched today at a social sector event of innovation leaders, ‘Unlocking Innovation in the Third Sector’, hosted by the AGSM in Sydney. Guest speakers from highly innovative NFPs will explore how findings from the Index can help charitable organisations optimise innovation.

The most innovative NFPs identified in the 2017 Innovation Index:

Top NFP innovators based on index scores (Top 4)

1. Cure Brain Cancer Foundation
2. Movember Foundation
3. Cerebral Palsy Alliance
4. Breast Cancer Network Australia

Top NFP innovators voted by their peers (Top 3)

1. Thankyou 2. Movember 3. Beyondblue

For more details on the Innovation Index, including top NFP innovators and 2017 partners, visit nfpinnovationindex.com.au.

 

Landcare relieved at the Government’s on-going financial commitment of $1.1 billion

The National Landcare Network and Landcare Australia recently welcomed the Federal Government’s allocation of $1 billion to the National Landcare Programme. This secures funding for the five-year programme commencing in the 2019 fiscal year.

The additional $100 million funding that was announced in December 2016 has been allocated for on-ground projects by Landcare groups and sustainable agriculture grants, in addition to being used for new Indigenous Protected Areas. The funds will also support the work of the National Landcare Network and Landcare Australia.

Jim Adams, CEO of the National Landcare Network is pleased with the announcement and believes it demonstrates the government’s commitment to supporting a sustainable future for agriculture, as well as the 5,400 Landcare groups across Australia.

Tessa Jakszewicz, CEO of Landcare Australia, acknowledged the positive impact the Government’s promise of $1.1 billion will have on supporting the Landcare community.

Both organisations look forward to working closely with the Government in planning the next steps in how the National Landcare Programme will be delivered over the next five years.

 

New Strategic Grants Connecting Up partnership to assist community organisations

Grants specialists Strategic Grants and Connecting Up, the technology discount and donation provider to the NFP sector, have partnered to provide a discounted package of grants training, resources and customised online grants management system to community organisations with annual turnover under $500,000.

GEM Local, which launched in 2016, is a powerful online fundraising tool providing small organisations with a customised and always up-to-date grants calendar of just those grants that fit their legal eligibility, geographic location of their projects, and types of projects they are seeking grants for. GEM Local also provides a place to record application details and sends subscribers email alerts about upcoming grant deadlines.

Knowing how to find, plan for and write applications for grants is time-consuming and challenging for community organisations short on time and resources. GEM Local saves hours of grants research and guides the way to good grants processes, providing a suite of learning tools including a webinar, writing examples and handy checklists.

Current subscriber, Georgina Mason at Bowel Cancer Foundation Trust says, GEM Local has been, “…an invaluable tool to Bowel Cancer Foundation Trust… We have already received a large amount of funding to date…and with just me applying for grants on the weekends!”

“The discount on 12 month GEM Local subscription now provided to Connecting Up Members provides excellent value for money,” says Strategic Grants’ Director and winner of the Arthur Venn Fundraiser of the Year award, Jo Garner. “And best of all it will mean more community organisations can spend less time looking for the grants that fit them, and more time doing the incredible work they do in their communities.”

 

Queensland homeless charity expands to help women in crisis

Queensland’s oldest charity, The Lady Musgrave Trust, has expanded its revolutionary Handy Guide, which provides vital services for homeless women, to cover locations in regional Queensland, assisting more young women living rough.
 
Launched with the support of the Queensland Government, Griffith University and Centacare, thehandyguide.com was first rolled out in February this year as an online directory of emergency services throughout Brisbane. It was developed in response to findings that there are 2,000 women in Brisbane without shelter on any given night, as well as the high levels of homelessness throughout regional Queensland.
 
Prior to The Handy Guide becoming an online service, The Lady Musgrave Trust was only able to distribute printed copies of the guide to those in need in Brisbane. Not wanting to ignore the high number of women affected by homelessness throughout regional Queensland, The Lady Musgrave Trust launched its very first hard copy of the Regional Handy Guide, and expanded the online service to Cairns, Townsville, Ipswich, Mt Isa, Maroochydore, Mackay, Caboolture, Toowoomba and Bundaberg. This potentially helps thousands of women who desperately need access to homelessness services in Queensland.
 
CEO of The Lady Musgrave Trust, Karen Lyon Reid, says the new regional version of The Handy Guide in both print and online will have an immediate impact in providing much needed help for many of the 8,500 at-risk women in Queensland facing critical homeless situations.
 
The hard copy of The Handy Guide has solely relied on the support of local hospital services, Queensland Police, women’s prisons and hundreds of community organisations and homelessness support workers. Thanks to the support of the Queensland Government, Griffith University and Centacare however, the Trust has now been able to go digital as well as develop a printed copy of the Regional Handy Guide, and reach many more women in need.
 
For more information, visit www.thehandyguide.com. To order copies of the Regional Handy Guide, please visit https://ladymusgravetrust.org.au/The-Handy-Guide-Regional.

 

Nominations are now open for the 2017 State & Territory Landcare Awards

The State & Territory Landcare Awards are just around the corner, so now is the time for the Landcare community to submit nominations in the nine different categories.

The Landcare awards celebrate the achievements of the core volunteers around the country who dedicate their valuable time and energy into caring for the land and water that sustain us. The categories encompass a number of areas, including sustainable farming, Indigenous land management, young Landcare leaders, Coastcare, innovation and more.

All winners at the state and territory level will go on to be finalists at the 2018 National Landcare Awards.

Tessa Jakszewicz, CEO of Landcare Australia, encourages everyone to get involved and nominate deserving Landcarers they know for an award.

“Recognising our Landcare champions is vital for sustaining Landcare and its future. The opportunity to showcase the accomplishments of individuals and groups enables us to share knowledge, and serves as inspiration for the next generation of Landcarers.

“As a community, Landcare provides vital support to our land and natural resources. Many Australians recognise the importance of biodiversity and comprehensive environmental management in production areas, and Landcarers have been leading innovation in many areas. The awards are a mechanism to celebrate all that the Landcare community do and can learn from each other.”

Anyone interested in finding out more or submitting a nomination can visit landcareaustralia.org.au/landcare-awards.

Entries close:
Australian Capital Territory – 31 July 2017
New South Wales – 16 June 2017
Northern Territory – 4 September 2017
Queensland – 4 September 2017
South Australia – 15 July 2017
Tasmania – 18 August 2017
Victoria – 23 June 2017
Western Australia – 26 June 2017

 

Regional and remote arts touring projects receive a $2.8 million boost

The Australia Council for the Arts has announced more than $2.8 million from the February Grant round for three arts touring programs – Playing Australia, Contemporary Music Touring Program and Contemporary Touring Initiative – all with a significant focus on touring in regional and remote areas.

CEO of the Australia Council Tony Grybowski said the Council has a strong commitment to supporting artists and developing audiences, particularly in regional areas, and believes that every Australian should be able to access the arts.

“These three programs, with a focus on performing arts, music, and visual arts and craft, will receive more than $2.8 million to support emerging and established artists tour regional and remote Australia,” Grybowski said. “Arts touring programs are central to strengthening connections with local audiences and increasing access to the transformative power of art. This support is also critical to a sustainable, diverse and vibrant national arts ecology.”

The details of these three Government programs announced today, administered by the Australia Council for the Arts, are:

Playing Australia: Regional Performing Arts Touring Fund – more than $2 million will support eight organisations, a mix of performing arts tours including theatre and dance with 60 per cent of performances occurring in regional and remote communities.

Contemporary Music Touring Program (CMTP) – more than$190,000 will support 13 emerging and established Australian contemporary musicians undertake tours from country and folk to hip hop, jazz, pop and rock across all state and territories.

Contemporary Touring Initiative (CTI) – $577,000 will support four organisations to develop national touring of significant contemporary visual art and craft exhibitions, with a particular focus extending into regional communities.

The full list of recipients for the February funding grant round can be found on the Australia Council website under awarded grants. The Australia Council grants program supports a diverse range of artists, artistic practice, organisations and arts activity. For more information on available grants, please visit Australia Council Grant Programs.

 

Westpac Foundation to award $2 million in funding to local not-for-profit organisations

To celebrate Westpac’s 200th anniversary, Westpac Foundation will double the amount of Community Grants on offer this year, providing 200 grants worth $10,000 each. This is the Foundation’s largest Community Grants program ever, to help local community organisations around the country work towards a fairer, more inclusive Australia.

A record $2 million in funding is now available, and not-for-profit organisations that seek to tackle complex social issues by providing education, employment opportunities and improving the quality of life of Australians experiencing disadvantage are encouraged to apply.

In its sixth year, the Westpac Foundation Community Grants program has previously helped to deliver employment pathways for refugees and asylum seekers, support those experiencing homelessness, and provide employment opportunities for Indigenous Australians. The Grants have also helped provide safe refuge for women and youth who are suffering violence at home and assisted people living with disabilities or mental illness, as well as the carers who look after them.

Sinclair Taylor, Westpac Foundation CEO, said Westpac has a long and proud history of supporting all Australians, and is celebrating its 200th anniversary by doubling the amount of grants in 2017.

“This year, we’re thrilled to double the amount of grants with a record $2 million in funding to help create brighter futures for Australians who are experiencing disadvantage by backing the local community organisations who support them,” he said.

“For the first time, we are also asking Australians to get behind their local community and nominate a not-for-profit organisation they think would benefit from a Westpac Foundation Community Grant. These Community Grants are our way of ensuring local organisations can continue to help those that need it most.”

Westpac Foundation recognises that organisations can’t succeed through financial support alone. As part of each Westpac Foundation Community Grant, recipients also receive valuable non-financial support from Westpac Foundation via its ‘More than Money’ program, which leverages the skills, resources and networks of Westpac Group employees acting as Community Grant Ambassadors, helping these local community groups create even greater social impact.

Applications and nominations are open until 5pm AEST on Friday, 9 June. For the first time, Westpac Group employees will vote and help select the 200 Community Grant recipients. Recipients will then be approved by the Westpac Foundation Board and announced on 18 September 2017. 

To nominate, apply or find out more information visit: westpac.com.au/grants

 

New CEO for Cancer Council Western Australia

Cancer Council Western Australia has welcomed Ashley Reid as he begins his role as the new CEO of the leading Western Australian cancer charity.

Cancer Council President Professor George Yeoh said Reid brings to the role an extensive knowledge of community support services and a strong interest and focus in research and evidence-based services to support those most in need. “We look forward to Ashley helping to continue the important work being done at Cancer Council WA and congratulate and welcome him in his new role at Cancer Council WA,” he said.

Reid said he was looking forward to joining such an important and well-respected organisation. “As WA’s leading cancer organisation, Cancer Council WA represents nearly 60 years of service and support for research to reduce the impact and incidence of cancer. I look forward to making a contribution to such a vital cause,” Reid said. “The impact we can make through this support is profound. Despite much progress, far too many lives are still impacted by cancer so the opportunity to work with world-renowned staff and volunteers to support those affected and to work towards a cancer-free community is a great privilege.”

Reid begins his tenure at Cancer Council WA after leaving his position as chief executive of Ngala, where he worked for the past five years.

 

Community fundraising is set to change

Community fundraising is looking set to change with organisations now in full control of their data and brand online. Funraisin has announced a number of Australia’s most well known charities are switching over to better manage, recognise and reward their community supporters and provide personalised experiences as part of their effort to scale this area of fundraising. Amongst the names are The Smith Family, Cerebral Palsy Alliance, Mission Australia and the Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation.

Rhonda Yanitsas, Digital Communications Manager of Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation says, “We connected Funraisin to Salesforce so we can provide relevant, engaging and encouraging communications to our supporters, at the right time. It also means our community fundraising team can receive real time notifications of exceptional fundraisers so they can immediately pick up the phone, thank them and ask if there’s anything we can do to support their amazing efforts.”

Funraisin also offers organisations the ability to create unlimited community fundraising ‘themes’, providing choice to supporters who want to do something but just need a little prompting in the right direction. “The software comes standard with the ability to enable fitness wearables on any event, so a supporter can connect up their fitbit, Strava or Mapmyfitness account and do what they love doing already, to raise funds,” says Courtney Evans, Funraisin Co Founder. “And being a standalone, white labelled solution means it’s the organisation’s brand, not ours, being reinforced.”

Learn more at funraisin.co.

 

New CEO for The Infants’ Home

Elizabeth Robinson’s career in early childhood education and care spans 20 years. For 14 years she promoted quality assurance in children’s education and care services at the former National Childcare Accreditation Council (NCAC), and also served on the Publications Advisory Board for Childcare and Children’s Health. From 2012 to 2017 Elizabeth served as the CEO of the Australian Institute of Training and Development (AITD).
 
Elizabeth has a range of qualifications including a Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Laws and a Master of Business Administration. She holds memberships with Community Child Care NSW, the Law Society of NSW and the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She will join The Infants’ Home as CEO on Monday 3 July 2017.
 
A passionate advocate for children, Elizabeth has long admired The Infants’ Home for the collaborative way in which families in need are supported. Elizabeth believes, “Children and families experiencing disadvantage need assistance. The Infants’ Home is making a real difference through its integrated model of service delivery which provides families with a holistic, responsive approach.”

 

Technology the focus for skills exchange program

Telco Together today announced the launch of The Skills Exchange, a series of events designed to support charities in their understanding and use of communications technology, through a facilitated exchange between technology specialists and Australian charities.

The Skills Exchange was created in response to findings from Telco Together’s 2015 Charity Insights research program. This research demonstrated an important area of need by charities for greater short-term skilled volunteering in a range areas relating to communications technology.

“This program is essentially a place for charities and skilled tech specialists to come together in a facilitated environment to solve problems. It aims to increase capabilities around the use of technology by charities, while raising the awareness of skilled specialists about the types of technology related challenges many charities face daily,” said Renee Bowker, CEO of Telco Together Foundation.

The format of Skills Exchange events will involve participating charities pitching their technology problem to a room of skilled specialists. Each charity will then be matched with a skilled specialist who has committed to two days of corporate volunteering leave to help the charity resolve the problem.

The Skills Exchange will officially kick-off in Sydney on 4 July 2017, with further events to be held in both Sydney and Melbourne.  Registrations are now open to interested charities, click here to register.

“We’re asking charities to register their technology problems with us – and once selected, charities will be supported throughout the entire process, starting with assistance pitching their problem, through to post-event support to maximise the final outcome.  We’re not looking for charities to come up with the solutions they think they need – just a good description of a technology related problem they have,” said Ms Bowker.

This pitching style of event was trialled with a number of charities and skilled specialists in 2016 and has been refined to ensure a beneficial outcome is achieved for both charities and skilled specialists keen to use their time to help make a difference.

Telco Together is now asking for charities with technology problems to simply register their interest for the Skills Exchange event series before June 2 2017

Some examples of technology related problems charities may face could include getting advice on areas such as database design & management, network troubleshooting, management reporting & software, cloud & hosted services, and more.

The Skills Exchange program will also incorporate a stream-based approach in future, where small groups of charities are able to explore a particular topic in more depth over a series of sessions.

For more information on The Skills Exchange please visit telcotogether.org/SkillsExchange

 

Australians donate nearly $4 billion a year to charity but half admit they could give more

The average Australian donates about $200 a year to charity. People in New South Wales are the most generous, women are more likely to donate than men and 10% admit to never donating at all. These are just some of the key findings of new research on Australian’s relationships with charities.

The nationwide study, conducted by independent research consultancy Decibel Research on behalf of Canon Australia and released on 17 May, found that those aged 18 to 64 donate to worthy causes on average about once every two months. However, half of us admit we could dig deeper if more options were available.

The number of Australians who admit to never donating was surprisingly high. One possible reason is that a third lack confidence that their donations are being used to full effect, while more than half feel they’re not well informed on how their contributions make a difference.

In light of this, Canon Australia is launched ‘Donate or Keep?’, a new campaign in partnership with local charities Cancer Council Australia, Australian Red Cross and Starlight Children’s Foundation. For the months of May to July, Canon is giving consumers a chance to earn cash back, with a unique twist.

The campaign, which will see a range of Canon printers promoted through partnered retailers, plays on the fact that a quarter of Australians donate spontaneously. When consumers purchase a Canon printer, they’ll face a dilemma – do they donate their cash back to charity or keep it for themselves?       

A wide variety of Canon printers from the PIXMA, PIXMA Endurance, SELPHY, MAXIFY and PRO families will be available as part of the ‘Donate of Keep?’ campaign.

It seems charity really does begin at home, with more than 90% of Australians saying they would rather donate to local charities than those overseas. Charity also impacts consumer loyalty as 68% of Australians said they would be more inclined to buy products if a percentage of the price was donated to charity. 

 

Andy Tidy now working in partnership with three agencies

Jonathon Grapsas from flat earch direct says most Aussie fundraisers will know Andy Tidy as one of the brightest fundraising analysts in the world. “Andy is now working in partnership with three agencies: flat earth direct, eclipsis data and Clever Contacts and will act as Head of Analytics for all three businesses. With a focus on improving results, and offering improved analytical services for all of our clients,” Grapsas told F&P.

 

Shake It Up welcomes new staff

Shake It Up Australia has appointed Vicki Miller as Executive General Manager, Strategic Partnerships. Vicki has a strong background in management and not-for-profits most recently as Operations Manager for the Quest for Life Foundation.

Vicki launched the Jeans for Genes Campaign for the Children’s Medical Research Institute in 1994 and was on the Board of the Institute for five years. She spent four years at the Black Dog Institute as Head of Development and was the inaugural General Manager of the Barbara May Foundation raising funds to provide lifesaving maternal healthcare in Tanzania and Ethiopia.

“I’m thrilled to join the team at Shake It Up to help find a cure for Parkinson’s disease. This is a cause close to my heart as my grandmother lived with Parkinson’s for the last years of her life and we have friends who developed Parkinson’s in their forties.”

“I was impressed by the business model that Clyde Campbell has implemented at Shake It Up. All administration costs are covered by the founding directors so 100% of all funds raised go to funding research and this is matched dollar for dollar by The Michael J Fox Foundation. There are very few charitable organisations that have such a strong business model. I’m really looking forward to building on the Foundation’s existing partnerships and bringing on board new partnerships to help us find that cure,” said Ms Miller.

Clyde Campbell, Founder of Shake It Up will step into the CEO role and previous CEO, Ben Young will join the Board of the Foundation.

 

Kirstin Bouse

How expressing yourself authentically can help empower women in developing countries

Opportunity International Australia says, ‘Holding Space’, an environment where you can be fully yourself without judgement, is key to us having the capacity to give of ourselves. Clinical psychologist Kirstin Bouse will explore the concept of ‘Holding Space’ and how Australian women can harness it to empower women in developing countries, at the Inaugural Opportunity Women4Women conference in Perth on 13 May 2017.

Opportunity CEO, Robert Dunn, said: “I’m greatly looking forward to the conference, which will celebrate women from all walks of life and acknowledge that everyone has the right to exercise choice, experience social and economic empowerment and pursue their dreams. Kirstin will describe how supportive and non-judgemental relationships encourage people to express themselves openly and makes them more able to give in whatever capacity that may be, and that’s where we see the collective power of small actions creating big change.”

For Bouse, ‘Holding Space’ is about people connecting on a genuine, authentic level. “We are communal creatures and we’re made to connect from the minute we are born. If we hold space for one another in our relationships and with those we interact with on a day-to-day basis, then we are going to feel more capable of generosity, more appreciative of what we have and see that we’ve got more to give.”

Bouse hopes conference participants will see the impact they can make as one individual doing one small thing. “All small changes have a ripple effect, and ripples become waves,” she says. “One woman in Australia can help one or more women in a developing country by empowering them to grow businesses and break the cycle of poverty.”

Bouse is the author of The Conscious Mother: A simple guide to mothering with self- awareness, authenticity, confidence and connectedness.

 

Westpac Foundation to award $2 million in funding to local nonprofit organisations

To celebrate Westpac’s 200th anniversary, Westpac Foundation will double the amount of community grants on offer this year, providing 200 grants worth $10,000 each. This is the Foundation’s largest community grants program ever, to help local community organisations around the country work towards a fairer, more inclusive Australia.

A record $2 million in funding is now available, and not-for-profit organisations that seek to tackle complex social issues by providing education, employment opportunities and improving the quality of life of Australians experiencing disadvantage are encouraged to apply.

In its sixth year, the Westpac Foundation Community Grants program has previously helped to deliver employment pathways for refugees and asylum seekers, support those experiencing homelessness, and provide employment opportunities for Indigenous Australians. The Grants have also helped provide safe refuge for women and youth who are suffering violence at home and assisted people living with disabilities or mental illness, as well as the carers who look after them.

Sinclair Taylor, Westpac Foundation CEO, said Westpac has a long and proud history of supporting all Australians, and is celebrating its 200th anniversary by doubling the amount of grants in 2017.

“This year, we’re thrilled to double the amount of grants with a record $2 million in funding to help create brighter futures for Australians who are experiencing disadvantage by backing the local community organisations who support them,” Taylor said. “For the first time, we are also asking Australians to get behind their local community and nominate a not-for-profit organisation they think would benefit from  a Westpac Foundation Community Grant. These Community Grants are our way of ensuring local organisations can continue to help those that need it most.

Westpac Foundation recognises that organisations can’t succeed through financial support alone. As part of each Westpac Foundation Community Grant, recipients also receive valuable non-financial support from Westpac Foundation via its ‘More than Money’ program, which leverages the skills, resources and networks of Westpac Group employees acting as Community Grant Ambassadors, helping these local community groups create even greater social impact.

Applications and nominations are open until 5pm AEST on Friday, 9 June. For the first time, Westpac Group employees will vote and help select the 200 Community Grant recipients. Recipients will then be approved by the Westpac Foundation Board and announced on 18 September 2017. 

To nominate, apply or find out more information visit westpac.com.au/grants.

 

Report: Australia’s small charities offer big benefits to community

Australia’s smallest charities account for more than a third of the charity sector, according to new a report released by the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC).

The report, Australia’s Smallest Charities, was produced by the ACNC in collaboration with the Centre for Social Impact and the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales. Australia’s Smallest Charities is a sub-report of the Australian Charities Report, an annual analysis of the data reported by charities of all sizes in their Annual Information Statement.

ACNC Commissioner, Susan Pascoe AM, highlighted the significant contribution that ‘extra small’ charities make to the sector and the wider community. “There are almost 19,000 extra small charities in Australia – that is, charities with annual income under $50,000,” Commissioner Pascoe said. “Extra small charities account for 37% of charities in Australia, and make an important contribution to the local community. These charities in particular often provide more specialised, locally-focused services – and those communities appreciate their hard work and dedication.”

The report, which includes case studies from seven of Australia’s smallest charities, highlights the variety of activities undertaken, and the causes supported by registered charities across the nation.

“As with the sector itself, the most common main activity for extra small charities is religion,” Commissioner Pascoe said. “Social services, culture and recreation, and philanthropic activities are also popular activities for extra small charities. The case studies serve to show the value of an organisation which focuses on providing niche services of importance to their communities. They provide a snapshot of the incredible impact small charities can have locally, nationally and globally.”

Despite undertaking activities to support the general community in Australia, four in five extra small charities engaged no paid staff. “Volunteers are incredibly important to all charities across Australia,” Commissioner Pascoe said. “Extra small charities often rely solely on the generosity and support of volunteers in order to achieve their goals. According to the report, over two-thirds of extra small charities operated with volunteers only, compared to only 39% of all charities. More than 430,000 people generously donated their time and expertise to extra small charities in Australia.”

In total, extra small charities reported a combined income over $300 million in 2015, and held assets worth over $5 billion. “The income of small charities is different to the wider sector,” Commissioner Pascoe said. “For example, extra small charities received 38% of their income from donations and bequests – this figure is only 8.3% for all charities. Similarly, extra small charities only received 5.7% of their income from government grants – whereas government grants comprised 41.4% of income for all charities.”

The Australia’s Smallest Charities report, and the Australian Charities Report 2015 are available to download at australiancharities.acnc.gov.au.

 

Australian first, Flourish Australia to deliver mental health program funded by social benefit bonds 

In an Australian first, Flourish Australia will deliver an innovative mental health program to enhance the wellbeing for individuals in the community by drawing on private investment dollars to achieve tax-payer savings through reducing participants’ reliance on hospitals and other health services.

The Resolve Program is set to attract $7 million from private investment in social benefit bonds, with services to commence in October 2017. The funds will help as many as 530 people in and around the Penrith and Orange, NSW, areas with their mental health recovery journey. The program will help individuals who have been hospitalised as a result of a severe mental health issue over extended periods, with each receiving recovery-orientated support for up to two years.

Flourish Australia was selected by the New South Wales Government to deliver the program, given its 60-years of experience delivering community-based services and supports for people with a mental health issue.

Complementing existing local mental services, the pillars of the Resolve Program are a residential program for periodic crisis care, community outreach support and a 24/7 ‘warm line’ offering after hours phone support to provide advice and support before a crisis situation arises. Significantly, the services will be primarily delivered by Flourish Australia Peer Workers – people with a lived experience of a mental health issue who use their knowledge to help others on their recovery journey.

The program is intended to save the NSW health budget some $30 million dollars through reduced hospital admissions and reliance on other services. Some of those savings will be channelled to private investors who back the program by purchasing social benefit bonds, with returns of about 7.5 percent per annum expected. 

“Through the Resolve Program, Flourish Australia is embarking on an historic mental health partnership with the New South Wales Government,” Flourish Australia CEO Pamela Rutledge said. “Enabling people with a mental health issue to live a contributing life without frequent hospital admissions is a win for social wellbeing, a win for taxpayers and now also a win for investors.

 

Philanthropy meets parliament summit: 11 to 12 September 2017, Canberra, ACT

The Philanthropy Meets Parliament Summit brings together Australian funders, political leaders, and policy makers to meet at the heart of Australia’s political system. It is a unique event which helps philanthropy and government understand each other’s perspectives and priorities and how they can work together to achieve shared objectives. 

Given the changes we’re witnessing in democracies around the world, which was particularly apparent in 2016, this year’s event will also examine what these changes mean for philanthropy and its role as a catalyst for social change.

Day 1 (Monday 11 September) will be held at Parliament House, Canberra, and involve a combination of keynote addresses and interactive panel discussions, with plenty of time to mingle and network. 

Day 2 (Tuesday 12 September) will be held at another location in Canberra, with a focus on philanthropy and its role supporting advocacy. 

The full program will be released shortly: philanthropy.org.au/summit2017.

 

Benevolent Society continues to keep families together safely

The Benevolent Society’s Child and Family Services has announced it has been successful in tendering for an evidence-based, intensive family support (IFS) service. The new service for NSW, funded by FaCS, is Functional Family Therapy – Child Welfare, known as FFT-CW.

Matt Gardiner, Executive Director Child and Family, says, “This is wonderful news and an indication of the confidence in our work from our organisation’s single largest funding body. Other organisations have also been selected to deliver this in other districts and we look forward to partnering with them in rolling this out as part of the reforms to the NSW child protection system.

“We will be establishing the new service alongside our Resilient Families Program (Social Benefit Bond) in Central Sydney, which will give us an opportunity to deliver the two side-by-side to learn and potentially conduct comparative analysis of the two. We had been looking into FFT-CW for the last 12 or so months, as we know that state governments have been looking to increase their investment in approaches they know deliver a return and with measureable outcomes for children and families. Our job now is to deliver FFT-CW exceptionally well, and continue building the promising evidence base for the Resilient Families program.”

Last year, Resilient Families was successfully increasing the safety of children and their families to the extent that there was a reduction of children needing to be removed from their families (entry into out of home care) by 26% against the control group managed independently by FaCS. This service has continued to consistently deliver wonderful outcomes and positive results for families, now in its fourth year.

 

Crowdfunding platform Pozible launches new white label crowdfunding service with global NFP 10×10

The crowdfunding platform Pozible has announced the launch of Base – a new crowdfunding service that enables organisations to run their own funding platform. One of the first clients to use this new tailored service is global not-for-profit 10×10 Philanthropy.

Base brings a new way of crowdfunding for charities and not-for-profits, giving more flexibility to organisations by allowing them to create their own self-branded crowdfunding website. Organisations are able to approve and host fundraising campaigns by their community, set fees and issue tax deductible receipts to donors.

10×10 Philanthropy is one of the first not-for-profit organisations on board and has used Base to scale internationally, connecting crowdfunded projects from Hong Kong, UK, Singapore, New Zealand, Australia and the US. Base has been a custom solution allowing 10×10 to run a quarterly pitch night and using the platform to sell tickets.

Base differentiates itself through its approach to collaboration. All Base organisations and partners can share and host campaigns by other Base platforms (including Pozible). An example of this is AMP’s Amplify Ignite program, where PHd students selected for their program can feature on their Base platform and pozible.com simultaneously. The pitch event as part of the Amplify festival will also use crowdfunding to sell tickets for the first time.

 

New CEO for Cancer Council Western Australia

Cancer Council Western Australia has welcomed Ashley Reid as he begins his role as the new CEO of the leading Western Australian cancer charity.

Cancer Council President Professor George Yeoh said Reid brings to the role an extensive knowledge of community support services and a strong interest and focus in research and evidence-based services to support those most in need.

“We look forward to Ashley helping to continue the important work being done at Cancer Council WA and congratulate and welcome him in his new role at Cancer Council WA,” Professor Yeoh said.

Reid said he was looking forward to joining such an important and well-respected organisation. “As WA’s leading cancer organisation, Cancer Council WA represents nearly 60 years of service and support for research to reduce the impact and incidence of cancer. I look forward to making a contribution to such a vital cause,” Reid said. “The impact we can make through this support is profound. Despite much progress, far too many lives are still impacted by cancer so the opportunity to work with world-renowned staff and volunteers to support those affected and to work towards a cancer-free community is a great privilege.”

Reid begins his tenure at Cancer Council WA after leaving his position as chief executive of Ngala, where he worked for the past five years.

 

It’s time to apply for nib foundation’s annual Community Grant program

Charity groups across Australia are encouraged to apply for funding through nib foundation’s annual Community Grant program, which opened on 1 May.

Young people and carers will again be the focus of the grants program that will offer funding of between $5,000 and $50,000 to support grassroots initiatives that foster improved health outcomes for these target groups.

nib foundation Executive Officer, Amy Tribe, said the foundation is looking to support 10 to 15 community-based initiatives that tackle specific health challenges facing vulnerable and disadvantaged Australians in a unique and practical way.

“We want to help people live healthier and happier lives by providing them with the support and capacity to improve their social, mental and physical wellbeing, as well as ensuring they can access appropriate health information and education,” Tribe said. “We remain committed to supporting young people and carers, two important community groups that continue to face significant health challenges but can be greatly impacted by even moderate amounts of funding support.”  

Now in its ninth year of giving, nib foundation has committed almost $15 million in funding to 105 partnerships, helping to improve health outcomes in communities across both metropolitan and regional Australia.

“Demand for grant funding remains high with many community organisations needing financial support to ensure the development or delivery of their amazing programs. It’s always exciting to see new and innovative programs being established and we are proud to be advocates in supporting healthier communities through our commitment to helping Australian charities bring these initiatives to life,” Ms Tribe said.

The 2017 Community Grant Application Guidelines and Eligibility Criteria are now available to download from nibfoundation.com.au. Applications can be submitted via the online submission form until 31 May.

 

Vanuatu’s Tanna Coffee buzzing after $656,000 impact investment

Vanuatu coffee producer Tanna Coffee has secured a $656,000 investment from impact investors in a milestone deal for the region. Facilitated by The Difference Incubator (TDi), the significant private capital injection will help grow Tanna Coffee’s output five-fold, supporting more than 750 farmers and their families on the remote island.

The investment was made possible by the Pacific Investment Readiness Pilot, a partnership between TDi and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), which helps create investable opportunities for impact investors.

The investment is the second capital injection into the Pacific made by the Genesis Impact Fund set up by TDi’s partner Benefit Capital.

As part of the pilot, TDi’s team is helping businesses such as Tanna Coffee to do good and make money, ultimately contributing to sustainable economies across the Pacific and reducing aid reliance. Tanna Coffee grows, farms, processes, roasts, and distributes premium single-origin coffee on its beautiful plantation 400 metres above sea level, nourished by Vanuatu’s rich volcanic soil.

Two years ago, the plantation of 750,000 coffee trees was almost totally wiped out when tropical Cyclone Pam devastated Vanuatu’s 84 islands. Despite this setback, the company has rebuilt its operation and produced its first significant harvest since Cyclone Pam and now plans to directly re-engage all of the smallholder coffee farmers, many of whom lost everything during the cyclone.

The $656,000 investment will be used to develop 200 hectares of land and to increase Tanna Coffee’s production from 20 to 100 tonnes of roasted coffee annually. The land will be distributed in one-hectare plots to 200 farming families for them to grow coffee.

TDi worked with Tanna Coffee over twelve months to help build the business and secure capital from impact investors. This process included developing their business model and a framework to measure their impact, as well as negotiating the business’s valuation and terms of the investment.

 

One million Jazz apples donated to underprivileged

Montague, Australia’s leading family-owned fresh produce company, has vowed to aid underprivileged Australians this autumn by donating one million Jazz apples to national food rescue organisation SecondBite, to redistribute to local community programs throughout Australia. For two weeks in April*, Montague and Coles donated a combined 20c per kilogram of Jazz apples purchased from Coles Supermarkets nationally to SecondBite. The goal of the program is to reduce the statistic of 731,300 children under the age of 15 living below the poverty line, according to the Australian Council of Social Service 2016 Report.

Montague, together with the Jazz growers of Australia, will provide the initiative with a supply of one million apples. SecondBite will then redistribute these apples to third party community groups across Australia, such as the Salvation Army, Uniting Care and underprivileged primary schools.

Montague has been in partnership with SecondBite for over eight years. This year’s contribution is Montague’s largest donation of apples since its establishment in 1948.

*Montague donated 10c per kilogram of JAZZ™ apples purchased at Coles Supermarkets nationally between 17 April and 24 April 2017. Coles Supermarkets matched the donations dollar for dollar.

 

Living Cities Forum 2017 to be held in July

The Naomi Milgrom Foundation recently announced a new Living Cities Forum 2017 initiative, bringing together leading international architects and design thinkers to investigate the definition of liveability and attempts to illustrate the image of a truly liveable city as viewed through a design lens. Taking place on 27 July, influential international speakers include OMA’s managing partner David Gianotten (Rotterdam), RIBA Stirling Prize architect Benedetta Tagliabue (Barcelona), celebrated architecture critic, author and curator Mimi Zeiger (Los Angeles), and head of Arup’s digital studio, digital designer, professor and urbanist Dan Hill (London).

Naomi Milgrom AO, Founder of the Naomi Milgrom Foundation said: Design impacts the way we live and has the creative power to solve real-world problems. Living Cities Forum is a visionary think tank which will allow Melbourne – one of the world’s most liveable cities – to maintain its liveability for its citizens and be able to share its knowledge with the world.”

Commenting on the new project Minister for Creative Industries Martin Foley said: “There is no better place to host this forum than Melbourne, the world’s most liveable city but a hub for design, innovation and ideas. Design plays a role in so many facets of life and this forum will bring together leading thinkers from across the globe to explore how we can design a new future for our cities and communities.”

Living Cities Forum 2017 is supported by the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria and is presented by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation in partnership with Open House Melbourne with the assistance of Melbourne School of Design, Monash UniversityRMIT University and Australian Institute of Architects.

The forum offers an opportunity to gather global insights into the present and future opportunities, and challenges for cities. The conversation will be an international discussion about liveability, fitting for Melbourne’s current position and future trajectory.

Living Cities Forum will take place on Thursday 27 July at Deakin Edge, Federation Square, Melbourne. For further details visit https://forum.naomimilgromfoundation.org.

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